1. I won’t have affairs, not because you’re so perfect, but because I’ve decided to be disappointed by you, and you alone, and you’ll be disappointed by me, and me alone, rather than both of us foisting our troubled selves on innocent members of the community, who would be deeply annoying too once one got to know them.
    Utopia series: the wedding of the future | Philosophers’ Mail

    8 hours ago  /  1 note

  2. Perhaps the most dangerous by-product of the Age of Intellect is the unconscious growth of the idea that the human brain can solve the problems of the world. Even on the low level of practical affairs this is patently untrue. Any small human activity, the local bowling club or the ladies’ luncheon club, requires for its survival a measure of self-sacrifice and service on the part of the members. In a wider national sphere, the survival of the nation depends basically on the loyalty and self-sacrifice of the citizens. The impression that the situation can be saved by mental cleverness, without unselfishness or human self-dedication, can only lead to collapse.

    Thus we see that the cultivation of the human intellect seems to be a magnificent ideal, but only on condition that it does not weaken unselfishness and human dedication to service. Yet this, judging by historical precedent, seems to be exactly what it does do. Perhaps it is not the intellectualism which destroys the spirit of self-sacrifice—the least we can say is that the two, intellectualism and the loss of a sense of duty, appear simultaneously in the life-story of the nation.

    Indeed it often appears in individuals, that the head and the heart are natural rivals. The brilliant but cynical intellectual appears at the opposite end of the spectrum from the emotional self-sacrifice of the hero or the martyr. Yet there are times when the perhaps unsophisticated self-dedication of the hero is more essential than the sarcasms of the clever.

    … Neither is decadence physical. The citizens of nations in decline are sometimes described as too physically emasculated to be able to bear hardship or make great efforts. This does not seem to be a true picture. Citizens of great nations in decadence are normally physically larger and stronger than those of their barbarian invaders …

    Information Processing: The Fate of Empires

    1 day ago  /  0 notes  /  Source: infoproc.blogspot.com

  3. There does not appear to be any doubt that money is the agent which causes the decline of this strong, brave and self-confident people. The decline in courage, enterprise and a sense of duty is, however, gradual. The first direction in which wealth injures the nation is a moral one. Money replaces honour and adventure as the objective of the best young men. Moreover, men do not normally seek to make money for their country or their community, but for themselves. Gradually, and almost imperceptibly, the Age of Affluence silences the voice of duty. The object of the young and the ambitious is no longer fame, honour or service, but cash. Education undergoes the same gradual transformation. No longer do schools aim at producing brave patriots ready to serve their country. [ Or to discover great things for all mankind! ] Parents and students alike seek the educational qualifications which will command the highest salaries.
    Information Processing: The Fate of Empires

    1 day ago  /  2 notes  /  Source: infoproc.blogspot.com

  4. Working is hard, but thinking about working is pretty fun. The result of that that statement is the software industry.
    Doomed to Repeat It — The Message — Medium

    1 week ago  /  2 notes

  5. Nothing says “I reject everyone else’s way of seeing the world in favor of my own” more clearly than declaring email bankruptcy; it’s the digital equivalent of baptism into a new faith.
    Doomed to Repeat It — The Message — Medium

    1 week ago  /  1 note

  6. Is there another form of communication besides email where the acknowledged goal is to hide all of the communication?
    Doomed to Repeat It — The Message — Medium

    1 week ago  /  1 note

  7. I noticed, as I got older, new acquaintances that would see the apartment for the first time would observe, “Whoa, you’ve got a lot of CDs!” and be done with it, instead of saying “Whoa, nice assortment of Derek Bailey music,” or whatever I might have been hoping for.
    Off the Rack: Notes on Reducing My CD Collection — www.wonderingsound.com

    1 week ago  /  0 notes  /  Source: readability.com

  8. Will the cloud’s infinite possibility result in me hearing more music than ever before—even more than now? Or will it result in me just pulling out the same old favorites—and forgetting that there’s other music lurking within, waiting to be discovered—simply because I’m not confronted with it when I wander through my collection?
    Listening to My Life: Lost in the Shuffle — www.pastemagazine.com

    1 week ago  /  0 notes  /  Source: readability.com

  9. Mammals have evolved to monitor their environments for dangers and opportunities, and so focusing completely internally for several minutes is unnatural.
    People Prefer Electric Shocks to Being Alone With Their Thoughts

    2 weeks ago  /  2 notes

  10. even among those who said they would pay money not to feel the shock again, a quarter of the women and two thirds of the men gave themselves a zap when left with their own thoughts. (One outlier pressed the button 190 times in the 15 minutes.)
    People Prefer Electric Shocks to Being Alone With Their Thoughts

    2 weeks ago  /  0 notes